An Activist`s day in the Civil Rights Era

An Activist’s day in the CivilRights Era

An Activist’s day in the CivilRights Era

Activist Rosa Parks

I suppose the American history shall forever evoke the events of thisday among the significant fights against racial segregation. Todaycould have been like any other day of my life were it not for arepeat of an event that occurred twenty four years back when a whitedriver ejected me from a bus for refusing to offer my seat to a whiteman.

I board the Cleveland Avenue bus at around 6 p.m. in downtownMontgomery. I pay my fair and throw myself on an empty seat set asidefor blacks in the ‘colored’ section. At first, I barely noticeJames F. Blake, the same driver who left me on the train in 1943. Thebus stops at the Empire Theatre to collect more passengers who happento be white. Blake notes that three of the white men are missingseats, and so he moves the ‘colored section’ sign behind me anddemands that four black people give up their seats for the white men.Three of the black passengers excuse the white men and I the daughterof James McCauley do not budge an inch.

Living in the era that has legally enforced racial segregation is sopainful. My thoughts shift to my grandparents’ stories of theirlives as slaves as well as recalling the Ku Klux Klan after World WarI. My family and community emphasise self-dignity and self-pride. Thewhites should not make us feel inferior. In fact, this is a reminderof what other blacks have endured, especially considering thestruggles of Rosa Park (Brittain, 2014). I,therefore, seem determined to cover my body similar to a quilt in thewinter night. My thoughts shift to Emmett Till case, and I decide notto go back on this. I am entitled to claim total freedom no matterwhat the sacrifice just like I had learnt in the history lessons. Sowhen Blake confronts me, I tell him to his face and blatantly that Ido not think I will stand. Blake says that he will call the police ifI do not comply.

I want to know once and for all, the rights possessed by a humanbeing because I am exhausted by giving in. Faithful to his threats,the police arrive, tie my hands and take me to the station. I amarrested and maybe it is the last time that I ever transverse in thehumiliation of this calibre.

References

Brittain, V. (2014). The Rebellious Life of Mrs.Rosa Parks. Race &amp Class,55(3),93-98. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0306396813509200

An Activist’s day in the CivilRights Era

An Activist’s day in the CivilRights Era

Activist Rosa Parks

I suppose the American history shall forever evoke the events of thisday among the significant fights against racial segregation. Todaycould have been like any other day of my life were it not for arepeat of an event that occurred twenty four years back when a whitedriver ejected me from a bus for refusing to offer my seat to a whiteman.

I board the Cleveland Avenue bus at around 6 p.m. in downtownMontgomery. I pay my fair and throw myself on an empty seat set asidefor blacks in the ‘colored’ section. At first, I barely noticeJames F. Blake, the same driver who left me on the train in 1943. Thebus stops at the Empire Theatre to collect more passengers who happento be white. Blake notes that three of the white men are missingseats, and so he moves the ‘colored section’ sign behind me anddemands that four black people give up their seats for the white men.Three of the black passengers excuse the white men and I the daughterof James McCauley do not budge an inch.

Living in the era that has legally enforced racial segregation is sopainful. My thoughts shift to my grandparents’ stories of theirlives as slaves as well as recalling the Ku Klux Klan after World WarI. My family and community emphasise self-dignity and self-pride. Thewhites should not make us feel inferior. In fact, this is a reminderof what other blacks have endured, especially considering thestruggles of Rosa Park (Brittain, 2014). I,therefore, seem determined to cover my body similar to a quilt in thewinter night. My thoughts shift to Emmett Till case, and I decide notto go back on this. I am entitled to claim total freedom no matterwhat the sacrifice just like I had learnt in the history lessons. Sowhen Blake confronts me, I tell him to his face and blatantly that Ido not think I will stand. Blake says that he will call the police ifI do not comply.

I want to know once and for all, the rights possessed by a humanbeing because I am exhausted by giving in. Faithful to his threats,the police arrive, tie my hands and take me to the station. I amarrested and maybe it is the last time that I ever transverse in thehumiliation of this calibre.

References

Brittain, V. (2014). The Rebellious Life of Mrs.Rosa Parks. Race &amp Class,55(3),93-98. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0306396813509200