Differences in Social Class

DIFFERENCES IN SOCIAL CLASS 1

Differencesin Social Class

Social classrefers to the group of people in a stratified hierarchy. Thehierarchy is based on the level of education, wealth, occupation,income, and social network. In the United States, the social classhierarchy of a person has a far-reaching consequence (Beck &ampBeck-Gernsheim, 2002). The whole issue is controversial with manysocial scientists in the country disagreeing with its definition,models, and even by whether or not a distinction in classes exists.Americans only believe in the three-class model, which includes theupper or rich, the middle, and the working or poor class. However,there are other complex models proposed by the social scientists(Carlson &amp England, 2011). It is clear the socio-economic status(SES), regardless of the model used, is wired to particular resourcesand opportunities.

The SES describes a person`s definitive position in the hierarchy andis defined by the amount of wealth, income, educational attainment,and occupational prestige. In the United States, individuals in thehighest bracket of SES are known as the upper class, which are likelyto experience better health care, acquire a better education, and areinfluential in the society. According to Kusserow (2004), the&quotAmerican Dream&quot for instance, holds the belief the UnitedStates society is regarded as meritocratic, and that the status isdefined based on a person`s achievement. However, social scientistsbelieve that the consequences are as a result of the persistentinequality in America and that it either is advantageous ordisadvantageous.

The disagreement between the social scientists in the United Statesover its definition and focus on the far-fetching consequences, areassociated in with the socioeconomic status that will form a thesisstatement for this proposal paper. The paper will focus on theconsequences as a result of the social class position based on howthe society define the American people and how the models are takenadvantage of to access opportunities in the country. Theseconsequences include:

  1. Education. What significant impact a person`s social class has on his or her education opportunities? The paper will seek to answer the question not only on the ability of the wealthy parents to send their children to expensive, exclusive schools perceived as better. Ideas by Kusserow (2004) will be studied to identify how the different models perceive state-supported schools offer upper social class children the much-needed quality education and not the children from the lower class. The paper will also draw relevance from a study by McCloud &amp Mirola (2009) about the connection existing between education and social class.

  2. Health and nutrition. As a consequence of the difference in social class, impact on physical health, adequate medical care, and life expectancy levels will be studied. How has this consequence define the American people? How has economic status define these classes on health and nutrition? The paper will access a research by DasGupta (2015) on how low social class families are characterized by high rates of cancer, infant mortality, and cardiovascular disease.

  3. Employment. How has this consequence impact on other consequences? Considering employment partly defines a person`s economic status, the research study will look at the freedoms granted depending on one`s occupation. Carlson &amp England (2011) identifies the upper-class individuals to be having a greater amount of freedom compared to other classes. The study will also shade light on how the lack of job satisfaction and job alienating conditions defines a person`s social ability with others at the workplace.

  4. Class conflict. Having studied the first three consequences, how have these consequences result in class conflict. It is also referred to as class struggle or warfare whereby it is characterized by tension in the society mainly because of the difference in socioeconomic status and desires among different classes of the American (Beck &amp Beck-Gernsheim, 2002). Additionally, the paper will draw relevance in Karl Marx`s history of what was considered a class conflict society, where he pointed out on necessity for revolution due to the rise of the wealthy individuals.

References

Beck, U., &amp Beck-Gernsheim, E. (2002). Individualization:Institutionalized individualism and its social and politicalconsequences. London: SAGE.

Carlson, M. J., &amp England, P. (2011). Social class and changingfamilies in an unequal America. Stanford, Calif: Stanford UniversityPress.

DasGupta, K.(2015). Introducing social stratification: The causes &ampconsequences of inequality.

McCloud, S., &amp Mirola, W. A. (2009). Religion and class inAmerica: Culture, history, and politics. Leiden: Brill.

Kusserow, A. (2004). American individualisms: Child rearing andsocial class in three neighborhoods. New York: PalgraveMacmillan.

DIFFERENCES IN SOCIAL CLASS 1

Differencesin Social Class

Social classrefers to the group of people in a stratified hierarchy. Thehierarchy is based on the level of education, wealth, occupation,income, and social network. In the United States, the social classhierarchy of a person has a far-reaching consequence (Beck &ampBeck-Gernsheim, 2002). The whole issue is controversial with manysocial scientists in the country disagreeing with its definition,models, and even by whether or not a distinction in classes exists.Americans only believe in the three-class model, which includes theupper or rich, the middle, and the working or poor class. However,there are other complex models proposed by the social scientists(Carlson &amp England, 2011). It is clear the socio-economic status(SES), regardless of the model used, is wired to particular resourcesand opportunities.

The SES describes a person`s definitive position in the hierarchy andis defined by the amount of wealth, income, educational attainment,and occupational prestige. In the United States, individuals in thehighest bracket of SES are known as the upper class, which are likelyto experience better health care, acquire a better education, and areinfluential in the society. According to Kusserow (2004), the&quotAmerican Dream&quot for instance, holds the belief the UnitedStates society is regarded as meritocratic, and that the status isdefined based on a person`s achievement. However, social scientistsbelieve that the consequences are as a result of the persistentinequality in America and that it either is advantageous ordisadvantageous.

The disagreement between the social scientists in the United Statesover its definition and focus on the far-fetching consequences, areassociated in with the socioeconomic status that will form a thesisstatement for this proposal paper. The paper will focus on theconsequences as a result of the social class position based on howthe society define the American people and how the models are takenadvantage of to access opportunities in the country. Theseconsequences include:

  1. Education. What significant impact a person`s social class has on his or her education opportunities? The paper will seek to answer the question not only on the ability of the wealthy parents to send their children to expensive, exclusive schools perceived as better. Ideas by Kusserow (2004) will be studied to identify how the different models perceive state-supported schools offer upper social class children the much-needed quality education and not the children from the lower class. The paper will also draw relevance from a study by McCloud &amp Mirola (2009) about the connection existing between education and social class.

  2. Health and nutrition. As a consequence of the difference in social class, impact on physical health, adequate medical care, and life expectancy levels will be studied. How has this consequence define the American people? How has economic status define these classes on health and nutrition? The paper will access a research by DasGupta (2015) on how low social class families are characterized by high rates of cancer, infant mortality, and cardiovascular disease.

  3. Employment. How has this consequence impact on other consequences? Considering employment partly defines a person`s economic status, the research study will look at the freedoms granted depending on one`s occupation. Carlson &amp England (2011) identifies the upper-class individuals to be having a greater amount of freedom compared to other classes. The study will also shade light on how the lack of job satisfaction and job alienating conditions defines a person`s social ability with others at the workplace.

  4. Class conflict. Having studied the first three consequences, how have these consequences result in class conflict. It is also referred to as class struggle or warfare whereby it is characterized by tension in the society mainly because of the difference in socioeconomic status and desires among different classes of the American (Beck &amp Beck-Gernsheim, 2002). Additionally, the paper will draw relevance in Karl Marx`s history of what was considered a class conflict society, where he pointed out on necessity for revolution due to the rise of the wealthy individuals.

References

Beck, U., &amp Beck-Gernsheim, E. (2002). Individualization:Institutionalized individualism and its social and politicalconsequences. London: SAGE.

Carlson, M. J., &amp England, P. (2011). Social class and changingfamilies in an unequal America. Stanford, Calif: Stanford UniversityPress.

DasGupta, K.(2015). Introducing social stratification: The causes &ampconsequences of inequality.

McCloud, S., &amp Mirola, W. A. (2009). Religion and class inAmerica: Culture, history, and politics. Leiden: Brill.

Kusserow, A. (2004). American individualisms: Child rearing andsocial class in three neighborhoods. New York: PalgraveMacmillan.