Family, Communication, and Mealtimes

FAMILY, COMMUNICATION, AND MEALTIMES 4

Family,Communication, and Mealtimes

Family,Communication, and Mealtimes

FamilyDisintegration

Unwaveringand healthy families are the source of powerful societies. It is fromthe family upbringing that individuals’ psychological, emotionaland physical growth and development happens. From the family, peoplelearn unrestricted love, comprehend the correct and wrong things, andacquire self- regulation, respect and compassion. These charactershelp people to engage optimistically at work, learning institutionsand in the society. Families are, however, breaking down, and this isto the disadvantage of the society. Family disintegration is not asingle occasion, but a process that includes various protective andrisk factors that intermingle in compound ways both prior andsubsequent to parental divorce to limit or raise the risk ofundesirable results related to family breakdown. Family breakdown isbeing caused by the following factors lack of proper communication,parental conflict, and financial hardship, quality of the parent-child associations and parenting and repeated arrangements of living,family structure included (Holden, Kilkey &amp Ramia, 2011).

Significanceof Shared Meal Times

Thereare suggestions from research that shared family meals providebenefits for the family and particularly for the youth and children.According to Cook &amp Dunifon (2012), children who are engaged infamily meals are likely to benefit in the following ways first, theyare not much likely to be overweight, have greater achievements inacademics, have less criminal behavior, improved emotional andpsychological welfare, eat foods that are more healthy and nutritiousand are optimistic on family interactions. The finding that was mostcompelling to me from the research was for members of the family whoare present during meal times. The research found that the mostbeneficial meals are the ones that are shared in the presence of bothparents, although some show that the outcome varies in relation tothe number of members presents during the mealtime. This finding wasof relevance the advantages of shared meals in large depends on themembers present (Cook &amp Dunifon, 2012).

Toensure more shared family mealtime in the future, the following willbe important to consider setting a target to have habitual sharedmeals three to four times in a week which should include not only thesuper but also break time meals and lunch (Cook &amp Dunifon, 2012).Emphasize the significance of constant family meal times as it canenhance the stability of the children. Third, always remember thatfamily meals’ quality is as equality important as the quantity, andthis will require guarding this special moment from externaldistractions to enhance the communication between children andparents (Holden, Kilkey &amp Ramia, 2011).

Definitionof Family

Pearsondefined family as a structured, relational transactional group,normally dwelling in a common living space over a defined andextended period, and who own a union of interpersonal pictures thatdevelop by meaning exchange over time. My definition of family isthat it is a group of people who are related to one another by birth,marriage, co- habitation and shared consumption. Pearson definitiondoes not fit mine because it does not consider the families that arebeing established by cohabitation and that do not take intoconsideration the extended aspect of time (Solomon &amp Theiss,2013). Also in my definition, the concept of what constitutes thefamily has evolved, and there are therefore adjustments of thoughtsand conducts concerning family values (Solomon &amp Theiss, 2013).

References

Cook,E., &amp Dunifon, R. (2012). Do family meals really make adifference?. CornellUniversity, College of Human Ecology, http://www. human. cornell.edu/pam/outreach/upload/Family-Mealtimes2. pdf (accessed October 30,2014).

Holden,C., Kilkey, M., &amp Ramia, G. (2011). SocialPolicy Review 23.Bristol: Policy Press.

Solomon,D., &amp Theiss, J. (2013). Interpersonalcommunication.New York: Routledge.

https://umuc.equella.ecollege.com/file/53b837fe-ef8b-468d-8a6ca9ae70aa0c11/1/Chapter9_InterpersonalCommunication.pdf

FAMILY, COMMUNICATION, AND MEALTIMES 4

Family,Communication, and Mealtimes

Family,Communication, and Mealtimes

FamilyDisintegration

Unwaveringand healthy families are the source of powerful societies. It is fromthe family upbringing that individuals’ psychological, emotionaland physical growth and development happens. From the family, peoplelearn unrestricted love, comprehend the correct and wrong things, andacquire self- regulation, respect and compassion. These charactershelp people to engage optimistically at work, learning institutionsand in the society. Families are, however, breaking down, and this isto the disadvantage of the society. Family disintegration is not asingle occasion, but a process that includes various protective andrisk factors that intermingle in compound ways both prior andsubsequent to parental divorce to limit or raise the risk ofundesirable results related to family breakdown. Family breakdown isbeing caused by the following factors lack of proper communication,parental conflict, and financial hardship, quality of the parent-child associations and parenting and repeated arrangements of living,family structure included (Holden, Kilkey &amp Ramia, 2011).

Significanceof Shared Meal Times

Thereare suggestions from research that shared family meals providebenefits for the family and particularly for the youth and children.According to Cook &amp Dunifon (2012), children who are engaged infamily meals are likely to benefit in the following ways first, theyare not much likely to be overweight, have greater achievements inacademics, have less criminal behavior, improved emotional andpsychological welfare, eat foods that are more healthy and nutritiousand are optimistic on family interactions. The finding that was mostcompelling to me from the research was for members of the family whoare present during meal times. The research found that the mostbeneficial meals are the ones that are shared in the presence of bothparents, although some show that the outcome varies in relation tothe number of members presents during the mealtime. This finding wasof relevance the advantages of shared meals in large depends on themembers present (Cook &amp Dunifon, 2012).

Toensure more shared family mealtime in the future, the following willbe important to consider setting a target to have habitual sharedmeals three to four times in a week which should include not only thesuper but also break time meals and lunch (Cook &amp Dunifon, 2012).Emphasize the significance of constant family meal times as it canenhance the stability of the children. Third, always remember thatfamily meals’ quality is as equality important as the quantity, andthis will require guarding this special moment from externaldistractions to enhance the communication between children andparents (Holden, Kilkey &amp Ramia, 2011).

Definitionof Family

Pearsondefined family as a structured, relational transactional group,normally dwelling in a common living space over a defined andextended period, and who own a union of interpersonal pictures thatdevelop by meaning exchange over time. My definition of family isthat it is a group of people who are related to one another by birth,marriage, co- habitation and shared consumption. Pearson definitiondoes not fit mine because it does not consider the families that arebeing established by cohabitation and that do not take intoconsideration the extended aspect of time (Solomon &amp Theiss,2013). Also in my definition, the concept of what constitutes thefamily has evolved, and there are therefore adjustments of thoughtsand conducts concerning family values (Solomon &amp Theiss, 2013).

References

Cook,E., &amp Dunifon, R. (2012). Do family meals really make adifference?. CornellUniversity, College of Human Ecology, http://www. human. cornell.edu/pam/outreach/upload/Family-Mealtimes2. pdf (accessed October 30,2014).

Holden,C., Kilkey, M., &amp Ramia, G. (2011). SocialPolicy Review 23.Bristol: Policy Press.

Solomon,D., &amp Theiss, J. (2013). Interpersonalcommunication.New York: Routledge.

https://umuc.equella.ecollege.com/file/53b837fe-ef8b-468d-8a6ca9ae70aa0c11/1/Chapter9_InterpersonalCommunication.pdf